2 American castles you can visit just now

The United States may not have royalty, but that doesn’t mean we’re above being kings and queens of our own domains. While none on this list were constructed to ward off enemies nor may ever have had knights feast in their halls, they are nonetheless grand, regal, and America’s own.


Having made a mint in the sugar refining industry, William Welsh Harrison contracted ambitious 23-year-old architect Horace Trumbauer to build him a castle. In 1893, Harrison handed over a fortune so Trumbauer could transform his fire-damaged home into a towering homage to the Alnwick Castle of Northumberland, England. The French Renaissance inspired its interior ornamental plaster panels and ornately hand-carved woodwork, made by local craftsmen. Other décor was inspired by the luxury of Louis XV. Massive halls were draped in elaborate tapestries and murals. All these touches made for a home that was as unique as it was astounding.

Upon completion in 1898, Grey Tower Castle was one of the biggest homes in America, boasting 40 rooms. Harrison lived there happily until his death in 1927. Two years later, Arcadia University (formerly Beaver College) purchased the opulent home, which is used for freshman dorms, lectures, and hosting special events.



Known as “The Father of Remote Control,” John Hays Hammond, Jr. cared greatly for three things: his bride, his work as an inventor, and his collection of Roman, medieval, and Renaissance artifacts. This trifecta of devotion inspired him to have a castle constructed on the New England coast in 1926. Hammond Castle was a wedding gift for his new wife, Irene Fenton Hammond. Its medieval architecture was a suitable setting for his impressive collection, while leaving plenty of room for his laboratory.

Some of the more curious details of the household include a two-story medieval meat and wine market modeled after a building Hammond spotted in southern France, and a custom-made stained glass Rose Window that overlooks the Great Hall and its pipe organ. Some say there are even secret passages carved within its stone walls.


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